‘Kilig’: Now Officially In Oxford English Dictionary

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The Filipino word Kilig is now officially added to the Oxford English Dictionary for the new batch of words for March 2016.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the word Kilig can be used as an adjective and a noun.

When used as an adjective, it means, Of a person: exhilarated by an exciting or romantic experience; thrilled, elated, gratified.” It also can mean, “Causing or expressing a rush of excitement or exhilaration; thrilling, enthralling, captivating.”

Now, if used as a noun, the word Kilig means “exhilaration or elation caused by an exciting or romantic experience; an instance of this, a thrill.”

The OED also gave examples to how this word can be used. It can be, “Kilig to the bones” using the word as an adjective which means utterly thrilled or thrilling.

Another example includes, “Kilig factor”, wherein the word was used as a noun which means “an element which generates exhilaration, excitement, or a romantic thrill.”

Lastly, it’s common use, for romantic things, “Kilig moment”, used as a noun, which means, “a thrillingly romantic moment.”

According to Inquirer, last June 2015, OED also included Filipino words like balikbayan, utang na loob, and KKB.

Now, one can use these words in situations like in playing scrabble. Many will think that this might be a joke but, try to show them that these Filipino words are now in the dictionary.

Indeed, language can be a barrier in different places all over the world but, this can also open up to new possibilities and connections.

Will you use the new word in the OED, Kilig even abroad?

Share us your thoughts and comments below. Thank you so much for dropping by and reading this post. For more updates, don’t hesitate and feel free to visit our website more often and please share this to your friends.

Sources: Oxford English Dictionary, Inquirer

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