Genes Reformation: A Boost To Space

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Genes Reformation Provides Answers.

Why can’t humans survive in space? Simple, the thin air and harsh ionizing radiation for any length of time or the conditions considering the microgravity makes it impossible. Genes reformation is said to be a help to combat it.

Just recently, a doctoral candidate at the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts shared in a talk in TED that some other toughest organisms on the planet have genes that humans might borrow to survive space.

Scientist could maneuver human and the bacteria and plants they get along with them to combat the conditions of microgravity in space with the use of synthetic biology tools – this makes another Earth on another planet, commonly known as terraforming.

According to Nip, this would be more effective and will cause less time than other terraforming methods that might by applied which might possibly include shipping of all the things that might help to come up a hermitically sealed surroundings.

Genes
Genes

However, the human bodies are still bound to its limits. Human beings are the superior homebodies.

We have already lived and adapted to an environment that provides caring conditions – the Earth have been abundant with oxygen for years and its temperate conditions has always made living possible.

Those who wanted to tie their fate to space explorations would really have to deal with the tough conditions and realities in the outer space.

It takes years for bones to get weak here on Earth but in the outer space, there is this microgravity that can weaken it, affect the heart, and destroy the DNA due to radiation according to Nip.

Mars is the next most possible to live at among the several planets in the solar system. Of course, Earth comes first. Yet in the point of fact, the average temperature in Mars is about minus 85 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 65 degrees Celsius).

It never rains and there is no shield against solar radiation with soil that goes almost the same with volcanic ash in Hawaii as shared by the doctoral candidate of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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